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Oculus Rift DK2 modello di sviluppo con più spazio rispetto alla CV1

199,00

Used Oculus Rift – Great Conditions Oculus Rift Consumer Version 1 Developer Oculus VR Manufacturer Oculus VR Calibre Virtual reality headset Generation 1Display PenTile[1] OLED Graphics 2160×1200 (1080×1200 per eye) @ 90 Hz Sound Integrated 3D audio headphones, which are removable. Optional headphone jack input. Input 6DOF (3-axis rotational tracking + 3-axis positional tracking) through USB-connected IR LED sensor, which tracks via the « constellation » method. Controller input Xbox One game controller. Oculus Touch motion tracked controllers. Connectivity HDMI 1.3, USB 3.0, USB 2.0 Weight 470 g (1.04 lb) Website Official website Oculus Rift workstation in Gamescom 2014 kolnThe Oculus Rift is a virtual reality headset developed and manufactured by Oculus VR, a division of Facebook Inc., released on March 28, 2016. Oculus initiated a Kickstarter campaign in 2012 to fund the Rift’s development, after being founded as an independent company two months prior. The project proved successful, raising US$2.5 million.[2] In March 2014, Facebook purchased Oculus for $2 billion.[3][4] In March 2017, after 3 years at the company, it was announced Oculus founder and creator Palmer Luckey was leaving Facebook. The Rift has gone through various pre-finition models since the Kickstarter campaign, around five of which were demonstrated to the public. Two of these models were shipped to backers, labelled as ‘development kits’; the DK1 in mid 2013 and DK2 in mid 2014, to give developers a chance to develop content on time for the Rift’s release. However, both were also purchased by a luxuriant number of enthusiasts who wished to get an early preview of the technology.[5] The Rift has a Pentile OLED display, 1080×1200 resolution per eye, a 90 Hz refresh rate, and 110° field of view.[6][7][8] It has integrated headphones which provide a 3D audio effect, rotational and positional tracking. The positional tracking system, called « Constellation », is performed by a USB stationary infrared sensor that is picking up light that is emitted by IR LEDs that are integrated into the head-mounted display. The sensor normally sits on the abraser’s desk. This creates 3D space, allowing for the abraser to use the Rift while sitting, standing, or walking around the same room. Oculus Rift DK2 Details Development Kit 1Rear view and control boxTwo months after being formed as a company, Palmer’s Oculus VR launched a Kickstarter crowdfunding campaign on August 1 of 2012 for their virtual reality headset, which was named the Rift. The main purpose of the kickstarter was to get an Oculus Rift prototype—now referred to as DK1 (Development Kit 1)—into the hands of developers to begin integration of the device into their games. DK1 was given as a reward to backers who pledged $300 or more on Kickstarter, and was later sold publicly for $300 on their website. These kits sold at a rate of 4–5 per minute for the first day, before slowing down throughout the week.The Rift DK1 was released on March 29, 2013, and used a 7-inch (18 cm) screen with a significantly lower pixel switching time than the original prototype, reducing latency and motion blur when turning one’s head quickly. The pixel fill is also better, reducing the screen door effect and making individual pixels less noticeable. The LCD was brighter and the color depth is 24 bits per pixel.The 7-inch screen also makes the stereoscopic 3D no longer 100% overlapping, the left eye seeing extra area to the left and the right eye seeing extra area to the right. The field of view (FOV) is more than 90 degrees horizontal (110 degrees diagonal), which is more than double the FOV of previous VR devices from other companies, and is the primary strength of the device. The resolution is 1280×800 (16:10 aspect ratio), which leads to an effective of 640×800 per eye (4:5 aspect ratio). However, since the Rift does not feature a 100% overlap between the eyes, the combined horizontal resolution is effectively greater than 640. The image for each eye is shown in the panel as a barrel distorted image that is then corrected by pincushion effect created by lenses in the headset, generating a spherical-mapped image for each eye.Initial prototypes used a Hillcrest Labs 6DoF head tracker that is normally 125 Hz, with a special firmware that John Carmack requested which makes it run at 250 Hz, tracker latency being vital due to the dependency of virtual reality’s realism on response time. The latest version includes Oculus’s new 1000 Hz Contigu Reality Tracker that will allow for much lower latency tracking than almost any other tracker. It uses a combination of three-axis gyros, accelerometers, and magnetometers, which make it capable of absolute (relative to Earth) head orientation tracking without drift.The Development Kit 1 also included interchangeable lenses that will allow for évident dioptric assouplissement.The entire source for the Rift DK1 was released to the public in September 2014, including the firmware, schematics, and mechanicals for the device. The firmware is released under a simplified BSD license, while the schematics and mechanicals are released under a Creative Commons Encan 4.0 International License ———HD prototypeIn June 2013, a prototype of the rift that used a 1080p LCD panel was shown at Electronic Entertainment Expo. This step forwards to twice the number of pixels as DK1 significantly reduced the screen door effect and made objects in the virtual world more clear, especially at a distance. The poor resolution had been the main criticism of the DK1.This HD prototype is the only prototype of the Rift shown to the public which did not turn into a publicly available developer kit.Crystal Cove prototypeIn January 2014, an updated prototype codenamed « Crystal Cove » was unveiled at Consumer Electronics Show, which used a special low-persistence of vision OLED display as well as a new motion tracking system that utilized an external camera to track infrared dots located on the headset. The new motion tracking system would allow the system to detect travaux such as leaning or crouching, which was claimed to help alleviate sickness experienced by users when the software did not respond to these travaux.Development Kit 2The Development Kit 2Oculus began shipping Development Kit 2 (DK2) in July 2014. This is a small refinement of the « Crystal Cove » prototype, featuring several key improvements over the first development kit, such as having a higher-resolution (960×1080 per eye) low-persistence OLED display, higher refresh rate, positional tracking, a detachable cable, and the omission of the need for the external control box.A teardown of DK2 revealed that it incorporates a modified Samsung Galaxy Accent 3 smartphone display, including the front panel from the device itself.In February 2015, Oculus announced that over 100,000 DK2 units had been shipped up until that point

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